The Sales Lion

5 Video Content Marketing Myths that Need to Go Away Forever

5 Video Content Marketing Myths that Need to Go Away Forever

It has been said again and again—We are officially a visual society. Whether it’s photos, video, live stream, etc—we want to see it, not just read it.

And while textual content may be slowing down in its efficacy, video (assuming it’s good), continues to explode.

This being said, there are still many businesses that don’t truly “get” the power of using video in their content marketing efforts. Furthermore, much of what they read in terms of “How to” is simply inaccurate and harmful to one’s success.

Recently, my business partner at River Pools, Jason Hughes, produced the following video of our newest pool shape (we are manufacturing these days)—the Oasis. And at the risk of sounding biased, this video will be a sales-inducing machine for that pool. Why? Well, in order to understand, you really need to watch the video. And don’t just watch the first minute either. Watch him get in the pool. Watch him swim in front of the camera. The lessons here, despite the utter simplicity of what he did, are profound. Furthermore, they align perfectly with something I’ve been meaning to discuss for awhile, which is bad video marketing advice.

Specifically, this video demonstrates, and at the same time dispels, some major myths and misconceptions when it comes to successfully using video to grow your business and increase sales.

5 Video Marketing Myths that Really Need to Go Away

1. All Video Should be Less than 2-3 Minutes Long

This “best practice” drives me crazy. Why? Because the idea that a consumer won’t watch a video over 3 minutes is simply absurd. The fact is, what actually dictates how much time someone is willing to spend watching a video comes down to 2 main factors:

1. The quality of the content

2. Where the consumer is in the buying process

Let’s look at it this way. Assume you’ve just decided you are interested in possibly getting a pool installed in your backyard. Right now, in a marketing sense, you’re at the very “top” of the funnel. And during this period of research, chances are you’d rather consume shorter content as you’re in “fact-gathering” mode.

But then let’s assume you start to get very serious about choosing a pool. In fact, you’re at the point where you’re trying to choose which shape would be most ideal for your yard, family situation, etc.

Do you think you’d be willing to watch a 10 minute video at this point?

Of course.

At River Pools, we have videos that last 30 seconds, 3 minutes, and 30 minutes.

Each one has their place. Each one represents a different spot in the buyer’s journey.

And this is exactly why the myth of “less than 2-3 minutes” really needs to go away.

2. You Need a Production Crew to Create Good Video

I’m not sure if you noticed, but Jason made this video ALONE. The guy turned the camera on, put the mic next to him while he was in the pool, and started talking.

How’s that for a production crew?

(Note* I’m not saying some video doesn’t necessitate a production crew. For example, a major product or service video that is highlighted on your company homepage likely needs more attention and production than one going in a blog post. This being said, the majority of video companies produce should, if they truly want to dominate, be of the quick/fast/nimble mentality.)

3. You Need to Have a Memorized Script

Do you think Jason had a memorized script for this? Of course not. And the reason you know this is because his tone and style were incredibly conversational. It was like he was simply talking with a customer. Now granted, I’m not espousing you just “wing it” when it comes to video, but the fact is, if you can talk to your customers when they ask you questions in an intelligent manner, you can surely talk on camera the same way– assuming you don’t overthink the process.

4. It Costs a Lot of Money to Make Effective Video

Most viral videos you see on YouTube cost little to nothing to make.

What’s funny is all these teenage stars you see on YouTube understand this. Their equipment, at least at first, is oftentimes an iPhone and a few simple free editing apps.

In the case of this video with Jason, the camera and mic together cost less than $1500.

5. Your Videos Must be Creative, Innovative, Original, Blah, Blah, Blah

In life, great teaching starts with simple communication. That’s why this video is so good. It’s not complex. It doesn’t speak over the head of the consumer. It’s not gimmicky and has no pomp and circumstance.

It’s just an honest guy talking about a swimming pool.

And that’s what makes it great.

The Time to Embrace Video is Now

Whether your business is already embracing the power of video or has yet to produce the first second of footage, the time is now to start giving the consumer what he or she wants. Get started. Don’t over think it. Put yourself in the shoes of the consumer and ponder every question, fear, concern, or decision they might have.

Then address them on camera.

By so doing, you’ll earn more trust.

And when all is said and done, every business, regardless of what they do or sell, comes down to that simple 5-letter word: Trust.

The following two tabs change content below.